Acetaminophen



Acetaminophen, the main ingredient in Tylenol, is touted as a perfectly safe pain medication to pop for the every day headache, backache, and pain in the behind. However, did you know that acetaminophen poses a particular problem to the MTHFR community?


In proper dosage, acetaminophen is, indeed, very safe to take for the occasional ache and pain, even for someone with an MTHFR variant. However, it should be not be assumed to be safe or advisable to take on a consistent basis. And when it is taken, certain strategic measures should be taken to counter its affects.


Acetaminophen depletes the body of its most powerful antioxidant, glutathione. This can happen, even when it is taken in its recommended dosage. Unfortunately, those with an MTHFR variant are already susceptible to having a glutathione deficiency. Mindlessly taking this pain medication on a regular basis, not knowing the effects it can have, can cause undesired consequences.

Symptoms of glutathione deficiency can range from chronic headaches, fatigue, and foggy thinking to poor immunity, frequent infection, heart attack, and stroke. If you're regularly taking acetaminophen for chronic headaches, I urge you to consider if you have developed a glutathione deficiency from the consistent medication usage! Many people find that overuse of acetaminophen causes the perpetuation of the very symptoms they sought it for in the first place.


I recommend using an alternative pain medication (in moderation, of course), such as ibuprofen. For those who may be allergic to ibuprofen and must use acetaminophen, I suggest making an effort to only use it when you really need it. The more sparingly, the better. When you must reach for the acetaminophen, I recommend countering it with liposomal glutathione supplementation.


 

To take a deeper, guided dive into how to thrive with an MTHFR variant, check out Hey MTHFR Academy. This 16-week online course will give you the tools you need to harness the power of epigenetics and befriend your MTHFR gene.